France’s SNCF to change website name as part of rail rebranding

thelocal (source) :

France’s SNCF to change website name as part of rail rebranding
Photo: Screenshot/SNCF website
The website of France’s national rail company SNCF is about to be renamed and given a new address for the first time in 17 years as part of the organisation’s rebranding of its services.
That means that from December 8th anyone using the booking website will need to use the address Oui.sncf rather than voyages-sncf.com.

The update, announced by CEO Guillaume Pépy on Europe 1, will bring the website in line with the company’s new “Oui” branding and marks the first time the site has been revamped in 17 years.

It’s important to remember that the change will also apply to the company’s phone apps.

And it’s not only the name that’s changing.

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Photo: AFP

The new site is expected to offer several new features including an email alert system, which will let users know when a low-cost, good-value ticket that fits their searches and budget is available.

“We’re keeping everything you like and improving the rest,” SNCF announced.

The change is part of the SNCF’s move to rebrand of all its services around the word “Oui”, which as we all know means “Yes” in French.

In July, the company’s famous TGV (trains a grand vitesse) service was rebaptised “inOui”.

The “inOui” name aligns the premium high speed train service with the company’s low cost equivalent, Ouigo, launched in 2013. It also fits alongside SNCF’s coach service “OuiBus” and its hire car service “OuiCar”.

The company also has OuiGo, its low-price TGV offer; the OuiBus network, and the car-sharing service, OuiCar.

The ‘inOui’ phrase is actually a play on words in French – as well as the word ‘yes’, the new name is also effectively the word ‘inouï’, which means ‘unheard-of [in a positive way]’, ‘unprecedented’, ‘incredible’ or ‘unparalleled’, in French.

 

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